Album Review: Without Andrew – ‘With Great Power Comes Great Irresponsibility’

WA

Without Andrew are a three-piece Manchester punk band who already have five years of experience in the music industry (with various line-up changes) despite their young ages. Their first full album Let’s Boo Boo was released around two years ago and they’ve since played a sold-out home show and supported bands such as Ashestoangels, William Control and The Dead XIII. Never feeling the need to stick to convention, their live shows and lyrics can be relied upon to be entertaining.

New album With Great Power Comes Great Irresponsibility has been a DIY production due to financial issues, but the band say they are immensely proud to have accomplished this. It comes after a tough two years in which the band nearly broke up. Commenting on this, drummer and backing vocalist Mat states:

“Our new album… is what we are referring to as a bit of a ‘comeback’ album, if you will. We’ve had a rough two years in which the band almost split up due to drama and tension within the band, which made this album somehow very special. The problems sparked songs and the songs sparked an urge to put out the best damn thing we could; we have touched on topics we never dreamed we would and have opened ourselves up in ways we didn’t think we would. This album has turned into something we are all super proud of. It takes a slightly different tone in comparison to our first album; it’s darker, heavier and not as whimsical, although, as you can tell by the art, we haven’t lost our fun side!”

The album certainly has the punk feel we’ve been promised; occasionally straying a little too far into Green-Day-mode but with more than enough originality to get away with it. They’ve certainly matured their sound since the last record, without having compromised on personality or the interesting song titles (see Who Hurt Lionel Richie.) Right from the start Wheel and Neverwinter throw catchy hooks at us by the bucketload, the type that get you singing along before you even realise you’ve picked up the lyrics. There’s instantly a strangely classic-yet-modern sound about it, how one would imagine the original punk bands to have sounded if they’d begun to make music today. Braindead adds an interesting pinch of harsher vocal style and more pop-punk guitars, all accompanied by lyrics about “fucked up braindead youth” which one can imagine being enthusiastically screamed back at them at a live show. No Escape also has the feel of something which could easily catch on, its fast pace ensuring a lively response. Dirty Rotten Liar produces a more relaxed tempo, but this doesn’t stop the powerful chorus rousing your emotions. The most forlorn track of the record is unquestionably Time Turner, but rather than being merely the token “sad song” of the record it has a sincerity to the lyrics which isn’t difficult to identify. The vocals prove increasingly versatile as the record goes on, and one notices how good the whole thing sounds for a self-produced album. There’s certainly a lot more to come from Without Andrew.

Score: 8 / 10

Listen to: Braindead

 

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